Legislation and Regulation

Legislation and Regulation

Saving Tax When Selling Your Business
Any serious entrepreneur or business person knows that planning correctly and minimising the amount of tax he or she pays to HMRC when selling a business is essential. What is more it is clear that higher earners are likely to be taxed even higher in the future with the announcement of the 45% tax band. We take a look at one way in which sellers of businesses can pay little or no tax on the sale of their businesses by using an Employee Benefit Trust (EBT)
Legal Aspects of Buying and Selling Businesses
When buying or selling any business it is essential that a lawyer is able to advise you on all aspects of the transaction. On purchase of a business you are buying all its liabilities and you may need to get indemnities to protect yourself from anything going too wrong.
TUPE Regulations
When buying all or part of a business, it is important to be aware that you will inherit not only its employees, but the responsibility to honour all existing contracts, conditions of employment and any ongoing disputes, tribunal claims and collective agreements relating to those employees.
Entrepreneurs' Relief
Entrepreneurs' Relief is a concession to the small business community who felt that the loss of business taper relief was an unfair tax on those selling their businesses to fund their retirement. Updated for the June 2010 Budget.
VAT Issues To Consider When Selling A Business
When buying a business, VAT must be considered. If not addressed quickly, issues to do with VAT can at best prove an unneeded additional complication and can result in delays to closing the deal. At worst, it can end up costing you a lot of money.
Tax Implications of Earnouts
When planning the sale of a business, the tax implications should never be overlooked. With careful planning and advice, maximum value can be extracted from the sale. Often, however, hard-earned gains unnecessarily slip through the vendor's fingers into the coffers of the Inland Revenue.
Should You List On AIM
Floating on AIM allows a company to offer share incentives to its staff, raise its profile, and take advantage of certain tax benefits. However, a flotation is not always in a company's best interests, and there are many factors to consider.
Should You List On AIM - Part Two
Calls For European Court of Competition
Calls for a European court of competion. A report from the Business Sale Report the independent listing of businesses for sale
Tax implications of Earnouts
With debt funding still difficult to obtain, other forms of finance for corporate acquisitions are becoming more attractive. Most particularly vendor finance is becoming more popular. Essentially, these are seeing whether the vendor may be willing to defer payment of part of the purchase price.